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Room

68 rooms - we call them Cosy, Original, Creative and Meandering. Each one is unique.

$235 / Night

Our best available rate
Prices fluctuate week to week.
Three Bedder apartment at Hotel Hotel in Canberra. Short term and long term rental.

Apartment

We also manage apartments in the Nishi building. While our rooms are a cacophony of textures, the apartments are a blank space. The walls are white, the shelves have space for you to bring your own bits and bobs and make you feel at home.

$185 / Night

Our best available rate
Prices fluctuate week to week.
One Bed lofts at Hotel Hotel in Canberra. Short term and long term rental.

Loft

And we manage split-level lofts just across the road and down the lane from us in the NewActon precinct.

$205 / Night

Our best available rate
Prices fluctuate week to week.

Any questions?
Please call Telephone +61 2 6287 6287

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Projects

Xylouris White

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(1 of 1) Xylouris White shot by Will Neill.

Xylouris White

Hotel Hotel Projects, Performance

You can’t walk into a Xylouris White gig and not walk out a little different.

They tap into something primal. Something spiritual. They blow away the modern skins of the body and leave you with just your ancient bones.

Through them we get to connect to our distant past. A reflex. It’s not music from someplace but music from everyplace. It’s music that reminds us that, despite our differences, inside, in this way, we are all the same.

Xylouris White came to play for us in the Monster Salon and Dining rooms on Saturday 11 March.

Xylouris White are George Xylouris and Jim White. Together their music is one of conversation and shared authorship. George is a Cretan singer and lute player – an instrument with a history of more than 3000 years that crosses borders like few others do. He sings in a deep baritone that vibrates through your core. Jim White is part of Melbourne’s enormously and long loved instrumental rock trio ‘Dirty Three’. He moves like a deep sea animal gliding from soldier’s beats to ferocious to soft delicate sounds.

But first, we ate. Monster kitchen and bar chef Sean McConnell made us dinner based on things he had eaten on a recent trip to Athens. We served each other from small plates of fava beans, chicory and calamari. Pan-fried haloumi with tiny slivers of okra. Baked eggplant with Labna. Fish bones piled up on our plates as we ate sardines and small red fish in barbounaki style. We drank Ouzo and wine from Kelafonia, Thessaloniki and the Peloponnese.

Then came the music. The corked walls, terrazzo floors and low-hung perforated panelled wooden roof created a resonant sound that you couldn’t escape from. There is no stage in there, so it felt like they were playing to us in our own family room.

Xylouris White played for two hours straight, treating us to two traditional syrtos that made the Greeks amongst us that night go a little wild. They twisted back and forth between an unstoppable barrage of power and gooey, transcendental melody. The final two songs had us all on our feet. The sounds they were making together seemed impossible. We were overcome.

(1 of 11) Dinner shot by Will Neill.

(2 of 11) Dinner shot by Will Neill.

(3 of 11) Dinner shot by Will Neill.

(4 of 11) Dinner shot by Will Neill.

(5 of 11) Dinner guests shot by Will Neill.

(6 of 11) Seanie in the kitchen shot by Will Neill.

(7 of 11) Nikos on the decks shot by Will Neill.

(8 of 11) Giorgos Xylouris shot by Will Neill.

(9 of 11) Jim White shot by Will Neill.

(10 of 11) Xylouris White shot by Will Neill.

(11 of 11) The End. Shot by Will Neill.

Salon Gatherings

Hotel Hotel’s Monster Salon and Dining rooms are a reinterpretation of the suburban family rooms of immigrants in Australia post WWII. It’s a domestic place. At once a parlour for receiving guests, for talking art and politics, a living room for lolling around by the fire with friends, a place for listening to music, and a room for sharing meals. At times, we gather old and new friends here to exchange ideas and we host conversations, poetry readings and performances. Fittingly, we often share stories about immigration, about how immigration increases the textures and layers of a place’s cultural fabric. These are important stories. Especially in a time when the number of people displaced by conflict is at its highest since the aftermath of WWII.

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